Some evidence of the importance of a religious education…

Apparently a Nazi spy made a bad error of judgment based on a lack of religious education, and was trapped by a more faith-savvy United States infantryman – George O’Connor – on duty in Italy, in World War 2.  The spy was disguised as a Catholic priest, and took out a Bible to prove it, according to Mike Marshall’s article in The Huntsville Times.

However, the Bible was signed by Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of the Christian Science movement.

Nothing unusual about that.  Mary Baker Eddy loved the Bible.  The healing theology of Christian Science that she uncovered and articulated in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures is rooted and grounded in the Bible.  And she amassed and studied quite a collection of different versions of the Bible over many years…the signature might well have been genuine.

But while her theology is catholic in the broader sense of the word – that is, “All inclusive; pertaining to all mankind” (Wiktionary) – her Christian roots were firmly Protestant, not Roman Catholic.  And what George O’Connor probably knew, was that the Catholic Church had not welcomed Mary Baker Eddy’s ideas, which she saw as a return to “primitive Christianity and its lost element of healing” (Manual of The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, Massachusetts, p. 17).

Recognising the resulting unlikelihood of a Catholic priest being so openly a member of Mary Baker Eddy’s fan club, George O’Connor realised that the man was in fact a German spy, nabbed his man and prevented the exposure of the presence of “442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit of Japanese Americans from Hawaii, Guam and California”, who had secretly reinforced his own 92nd Infantry.

Christian Science is indeed all about uncovering and confronting evil by the light of God’s omnipotence.  Despite the Mary Baker Eddy connection, however, in this case I think the credit should go to the smarts of George O’Connor, and the lesson learned might be that a religious education can prove a sound investment!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Categories: Uncategorized

Author:Tony Lobl

I write on spirituality and health for a diversity of online media outlets, from my perspective as a Christian Science practitioner. I have been published by the Independent, the Washington Post, the Guardian, E-Hospice, MindBodyGreen and The Christian Science Monitor and I post regularly on the Huffington Post UK and BuzzFeed. In addition to writing and broadcast appearances I enjoy engaging with journalists, academics, health professionals and government officials about the possibilities for improving health outcomes through a greater emphasis on spirituality in healthcare and social care. I've also greatly valued the many opportunities I have had to travel globally for my church and to meet people around the world. My wife Jenny and I spent 10 years in Boston, USA, before returning to London in 2002, to take on a role as the media and legislative liaison for Christian Science in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. I studied at the University of Surrey earning a BSc Hons Degree in Modern Mathematics before the impact of spirituality on health caught my attention and re-shaped my career.

If you want to keep updated...

Subscribe to our RSS feed and social profiles to receive updates.

3 Comments on “Some evidence of the importance of a religious education…”

  1. Jim Fisher
    June 14, 2010 at 8:12 pm #

    Great story! Thanks.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Tweets that mention Some evidence of the importance of a religious education… « "Oh, Lord, Please Don't Let Me be Misunderstood" – what Christian Science is, and what it isn't! -- Topsy.com - June 14, 2010

    [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by JD Fisher and Tony Lobl, Tony Lobl. Tony Lobl said: Some evidence of the importance of a religious education…: http://wp.me/pKuDK-4t [...]

  2. Some evidence of the importance of a religious education… :: Christian Science Texas - June 15, 2010

    [...] Tony Lobl, District Manager of the Christian Science Committees on Publication in the UK and the Republic of Ireland,  writes: [...]

Let me know what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,635 other followers

%d bloggers like this: